UK casino operators

We contribute over £300m in gambling tax each year. That does not include what we pay in corporation tax, business rates, licence costs, income tax and employee insurance. My concern, and I’m sure this is shared by the rest of the panel, is that while the casino sector is growing, we need to take a closer look at the underlying balance that is emerging in our sector. Casino attendances increased by 3.6 million over a five-year period from 2010-2015, and that’s clearly a positive, but in practice more than three quarters of that growth has come from London. Eighty percent of that growth has come from two London casinos – Aspers in Westfield, Stratford and the Hippodrome in Leicester Square. Attendance has fallen in Scotland, Wales and in the Midlands in the same period. The cause of this imbalance is hard to find. We think it’s down to the failed experiment of the Gambling Act 2005, which created a three-tier casino sector. The Act was supposed to manage a casino sector made up of multi-entertainment venues th at would have driven investment in the UK economy. The unintended consequence has meant that it risks leaving our sector unfit for purpose in the 21st century.

Tourists, overseas travellers and investors cannot believe we have a three-tiered system, where casinos established under the terms of the Gaming Act 1968 are restricted to a maximum of 20 gaming machines, small casinos are allowed up to 80 machines and large casinos may offer up to 150 machines. They do not know what to expect when they come for a night out. There are very often nowhere near enough machines compared to what they are expecting. Customers want the kind of experience they can get in Las Vegas, Barcelona, Macau or the major cities in France.

Even though casinos sit at the top of the gambling regulatory pyramid, we cannot provide a replica for the customer to gamble on our own online website. The government rightly pushes businesses to implement the latest technology, but because the legislative regime isn’t fit for the 21st century, the terrestrial casino industry is unable to take advantage of technological advancements in the same way that the remote industry can.

Casinos are a big UK buzzword for 2015, and the number of people enjoying casino games in Britain has never been higher. The relaxation of gambling laws almost 10 years ago has allowed for much freer access to both land-based and online casinos, resulting in a more open and accountable gaming industry that’s more easily accessible to the average gambler.

And, it’s not just online casinos that are booming right now – their land-based cousins are enjoying unprecedented interest as well. Where British punters were once forced to visit smoky underground spielers  or blacked-out, back-street casinos to play their favourite games, today’s UK casinos are able to operate much more out in the open.

From easier membership to offline casinos and fixed-odds betting terminals in high-street bookies, offline gambling has never been so accessible.Gambling in the United Kingdom is regulated by the Gambling Commission on behalf of the government’s Department for Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) under the Gambling Act 2005. This Act of Parliament significantly updated the UK’s gambling laws, including the introduction of a new structure of protections for children and vulnerable adults, as well as bringing the burgeoning Internet gaming sector within British regulation for the first time.For more information , Please Click on Live Casino Rank



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